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  1. Vibration sensor with IO-Link
  2. Applications and installation

Installation guidelines and sensor position

How to obtain unambiguous measurement results

As a rule, we recommend that you mount the sensors radially to the shaft axis to capture the greatest possible movement and be as close as possible mechanically to the effective area. In case of fixed bearings with high axial force absorption or axial bearings, the recommended measuring direction is axial to the shaft.

The orange dots in the illustrations indicate the approximate sensor position for smaller machines.
If two measurement positions are more than 80cm apart, we recommend that you install additional sensors as illustrated by the grey dots.

Note:
The sensor can monitor all characteristic values simultaneously and provide a switching signal for two selected characteristic values.

» All process values in detail

Axial fan

Sensor position Alarms Root issue
Primary sensor Horizontal driven end

a-Peak

v-RMS

a-RMS

Temp

Impact

Loose footing

Friction (bearing)

Overheating

Optional sensor Vertical non-driven end

Radial direct drive fan

Sensor position Alarms Root issue
Primary sensor Horizontal driven end

a-Peak

v-RMS

a-RMS

Temp

Impact

Loose footing

Friction (bearing)

Overheating

Optional sensor Vertical non-driven end

Belt-driven radial fan

Sensor position Alarms Root issue
Primary sensor Horizontal driven end of motor

a-Peak

v-RMS

a-RMS

Temp

Impact

Loose footing

Friction (bearing)

Overheating

Optional sensor Vertical non-driven end of motor
Primary sensor Horizontal driven end of fan
Optional sensor Vertical non-driven end of fan

Pump

Sensor position Alarms Root issue
Primary sensor Horizontal driven end of motor

a-Peak

v-RMS

a-RMS

Temp

Impact

Loose footing

Friction (bearing)

Overheating

Optional sensor Vertical non-driven end of motor
Primary sensor Horizontal driven end of pump
Optional sensor Vertical non-driven end of pump

Electric motor

Sensor position Alarms Root issue
Primary sensor Horizontal driven end

a-Peak

v-RMS

a-RMS

Temp

Impact

Loose footing

Friction (bearing)

Overheating

Optional sensor Vertical non-driven end

Gearbox

Sensor position Alarms Root issue
Primary sensor Horizontal driven end

a-Peak

v-RMS

a-RMS

Temp

Impact

Loose footing

Friction (bearing)

Overheating

Optional sensor Vertical non-driven end

At a glance: Vibration values and what they mean

Mechanical impact (a-Peak)

What is measured? Peak value of the vibration acceleration.
What is detected? Especially shock-like, high-frequency vibrations.
For example influenced by:

  • Colliding blade
  • Ingested object
  • Hitting rotor blades
  • Improper sequence timing

Mechanical friction (a-RMS)

What is measured? Effective value of the vibration acceleration.
What is detected? Mechanical friction.
For example influenced by:

  • Failing bearing
  • Rubbing impeller
  • Dragging blade
  • Cavitation
  • Rubbing processes (e.g. vane)

Component fatigue (v-RMS)

What is measured? Effective value of the vibration velocity.
What is detected? The energy the machine is subjected to. An increase can be triggered by low-frequency fault conditions.
For example influenced by:

  • Misalignment
  • Unbalance
  • Belt issues
  • Loose footing
  • Structural issues

Temperature

What is measured? Increased friction or electrical problems resulting in a temperature rise.
For example influenced by:

  • Insufficient lubrication
  • Loss of coolant flow
  • Electrical issues
  • Overload
  • Excessive rubbing

Crest factor

What is measured? Ratio of a-Peak compared to a-RMS.
What is detected? In combination with a second value (e.g. a-Peak) useful for the evaluation of bearing damage
Influenced by:

  • Failing bearing