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LDL sensors: Applications

CIP (Clean-in-Place)

To remain competitive, it is important to minimize production downtime without compromising the safety and quality of the product.

Monitor wash fluid concentration and completed chemical flush out of the line.

Phase shift/product verification

Regardless of opacity, conductivity can be used in some applications where turbidity will not work, and can detect the interface between rinse water, caustic or acidic CIP solution, and product. Only a measurable difference in the media’s conductivity is required.

Media used in CIP systems have a repeatable difference in conductivity

Leak detection

Heat exchangers use one fluid to heat or cool another fluid and a conductivity sensor on the outlet or in the condenser hotwell is an easy way to detect leaks.

This also ensures the fluids have not mixed and improves the efficiency and quality of the heating / cooling process.

Water quality

Raw water from lakes, rivers or taps usually contains contaminants that can cause scaling and corrosion in industrial plant equipment, particularly heat exchangers, cooling towers and boilers. Because conductivity is a measure of total ion concentration, it is ideal for monitoring demineralizer performance.  Ensure your process starts with the correct water quality and determine if it is reusable in another part of the plant or process.  You can reduce your overall water consumption if your final rinse water can be reused as pre-rinse on the next cycle.

Salinity

The concentration of salt (NaCl) in water can be monitored easily using conductivity.  As few as 5 grains of salt produce a measurable difference in conductivity. Monitor dissolved ionic solids in drinking water desalination plants.

Monitor salt water concentration to increase the cooling power of water (lower the freezing point) and to ensure high quality of brine solution used for various foods.